One needs look no further than the recent circus disaster to appreciate our culture’s fascination with hair. The circus act, known as the Medeiros Hair-Hang Act, captivated audiences until the freak accident left the acrobats, who suspend in mid-air by their hair, injured and the act on hiatus. Hair, throughout history, has fascinated us.

As Hilary Clinton stated at Yale University in 2001, “The most important thing I have to say today is that hair matters. Pay attention to your hair.”

 

In fact, according the research Rose Weitz, hair is one of the most important barometers of first impressions. How a person wears, styles, and uses their hair affects how others view you. Weitz, writing in her landmark book on this subject titled Rapunzel’s Daughters: What Women’s Hair Tells Us about Women’s Lives, claims that hair is powerful since it grows directly out of your head, it is typically visible for all to see, and it can be styled, reflecting much about your own nature and cares.

 

Hair is important for both sexes, but Weitz’s research suggest that it carries more significance for women. As such, the study of hair provides insight into many dimensions of women’s lives, including friendships, career advancement, and intimate relationships. For example, Weitz cites anecdotal evidence that career advancement in certain sectors requires women to have shorter and shorter hair. Hair is a key aspect of our appearance and numerous studies suggest that appearance, especially for women, influences career advancement, salary increases, dating, and marriage. It is little wonder that the hair industry is an important aspect of the modern world.

 

Weitz sums up her approach, stating, “”Hair allows us to look at the world around us and see all sorts of things that are so part of our lives that we never really think about them.”

 

Want to read more about hair health? Click here.

 

Source: Arizona State University News